Workshops 2019

Workshops that encourage, inspire and empower

 

 

 

Unpacking Te Whāriki 2017

An ELP workshop series for 2019

Don Rowlands Events Centre, Mighty River Domain, Lake Karapiro, Cambridge

"Ko te ahurei o te tamaiti arahia o tatou mahi

Let the uniqueness of the child guide our work” 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A FLYER FOR PRINTING AND SHARING WITH YOUR CENTRE

This series of 8 workshops will support teachers to unpack Te Whāriki 2017.  We have broken the series down into 4 mornings where you have the opportunity to attend 2 workshops on each date.  

Over the year we will be covering many of the new ideas within Te Whāriki, one small bite size at a time.  We will publish full titles and blurbs to each of the workshops over the next month.  In the meantime you can book your attendance and ensure a discounted rate by booking for the series.


Two workshops will be repeated over two sessions on the following dates:

SATURDAY 2 FEBRUARY
'Te Tiriti o Waitangi & Te Whāriki' and 'Using traditional wisdom in a modern world'

SATURDAY 18 MAY
Dispostional learning and working theories

SATURDAY 17 AUGUST
Assessment, planning and evaluation

SATURDAY 2 NOVEMBER
Pathways to school and local curriculum

Session one: 9:00am-10:45am
Break
Session two: 11:15am-1:00pm


Cost:
$90.00 per event
$324.00 for the whole series (a 10% discount)


Beginning on Saturday 2 February with Tania Bullick and Lynn Rupe:

Workshop One: Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Whāriki
Presented by Tania Bullick

Te Whāriki, as the first bicultural curriculum statement developed in Aotearoa, New Zealand recognised the guarantees of self-determination and protection that were granted to Māori in the 1840 Tiriti o Waitangi.  Jenny Richie writes “Bicultural development is generated by a commitment to social justice and the Treaty of Waitangi.  The term ‘development' implies an ongoing process of social change toward an equitable bicultural society”  In this workshop, we will discuss the history of both Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Whāriki. Drawing on the principles, strands and goals of the 2017 Te Whāriki, we will inquire into our tiriti-based practices which respond to our curriculum currently and we will explore the ongoing process of bicultural development into the future including conversations around placed based education ideas and how this builds a local curriculum around what matters in your setting. You will leave this workshop with increased confidence about your own and your teams ability to work with Te Whāriki 2017 as a commitment to honouring te Tiriti o Waitangi. 

Workshop Two: Using traditional wisdom in a modern world
Presented by Lynn Rupe

Learning stories are a moment in time when past, present and future come together in a way that will support the child to know who they are as a learner.  Traditional wisdom, "clothed within a whakatauki” can be used in a modern world to add another lens to the learning that is taking place for tamariki. 

This workshop will look at the weaving of traditional knowledge inside Learning Stories.  The new Te Whāriki uses whakatauki as a way to highlight and acknowledge the bicultural aspect of our curriculum.  The writers have drawn on traditional wisdom for a modern world.  Teachers writing Learning Stories can do the same.  Let’s discuss how! 


An outline of what will be covered on each date throughout the year:

18 May 2019

Workshops will consider the view of Te Whāriki on dispositional learning and working theories.  Again you get the opportunity to participate in both workshops.  A deeper look at dispositional learning facilitated by Wendy Lee and understanding children’s working theories facilitated by Lorraine Sands.

17 August 2019

We will cover topics that are always of great interest to teachers - assessment, planning and evaluation.  Michelle Flower will talk about assessment & planning and Tania Bullick will discuss evaluation.  We want to ensure that everything we do in ECE is meaningful, so what does it mean to have useful assessment, planning and evaluation?  "Assessment is formative, intended to support curriculum planning and enhance learning.” This inspirational morning will support teachers to understand how to plan and evaluate in ways that are meaningful and support individual children’s learning.

2 November 2019

We will cover Pathways to School and Local Curriculum, both new terms in Te Whāriki 2017.  Carol Marks will unpack the view of Te Whāriki on pathways to school while Lynn Rupe will ask the questions - what does local curriculum mean and what would you weave into your own local curriculum?

Book for the whole series now and save! Full workshop titles and blurbs will be released soon.

Click here to be directed to our online store to purchase

 

                                        

PROGRAMME:

10:00am: Welcome and Keynote 

10:30-12:30: Workshop Session One

12:30-1:30: Lunch break

1:30-3:30: Workshop Session Two

3:30-3:45: Poroporaki

Click here to download a flyer for printing

Early-Bird Price: $100.00 per teacher

Workshops will explore ideas around curriculum, assessment, planning, Te Whatu Pōkeka and Te Titiriti-based practice. Using these practices, we hold the child, their family and whānau firmly at the centre of everything, while honouring their contributions as a basis for the design of a local curriculum for your individual setting.

Session One – attendees to pick one workshop from the following options:

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngāhua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

Workshop 2: Matanga Kairāranga/ Expert Weaver

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Te Whāriki 2017 says, “the expert weaver will examine the foundations for planning and technique. If these are sound, the quality will be seen on the face-up side.” During this workshop we will delve into Te Whāriki 2017 and consider what you would weave into your local curriculum to create an whāriki worthy of an expert weaver. What does Te Whāriki 2017 inspire you to weave?

During the workshop you will have the opportunity to think about your local curriculum and decide was is valuable for children’s learning. Also you will ask yourself the question what makes an expert weaver? At the end of the workshop you will have a woven whāriki representing the foundations of learning for children - foundations that will support children for lifelong learning.

Workshop 3: “In every walk with nature one receives far more than one seeks.”- John Muir, 19 July 1877

Presented by Michelle Flower

Biophilia is our innate biological connection with nature. It helps explain why roaring fires and lapping waves captivate us; why being in a garden can enhance our creativity; why shadows and heights instil fascination; and why animal companions and strolling through a park have healing effects.

In this workshop we will look at the design considerations that support the relationships between children and nature in early childhood settings. Let’s create spaces that are inspirational, restorative and healthy, as well as functional. Environments that nurture a love of place, where curiosity, courage and wonder thrive.

Workshop 4: Not your standard flower…Let’s be extraordinary!

Presented by Lorraine Sands

We know that when children build their ideas about risk and challenge, they start from where they feel comfortable, then stretch the edges of their competence. They practice. It is when they are crew members rather than passengers that children ramp up their capacity for learning; adventurous learning that relies on a growing sense of fair mindedness and on curiosity and determination to stretch learning to the edge and beyond with and alongside their friends. And this is true for teachers too!! When teachers feel empowered to contribute their own passions, energies and spirits to their learning and teaching community and truly feel listened to, they ramp up their contributions. It is when we feel judged that we shrink away from contributing with whole hearted energy!

This was behind our focus and determination to make the professional work we do exciting, meaningful, and practical. Possible, in ways that would see us stretching our learning and teaching, with contextual evidence that acted as the trace of our professional lives. So, what about empowerment for teachers? What about strength based learning for teachers? And what might this look like inside internal evaluation, teacher appraisal and teacher certification?

Session Two – attendees to pick one workshop from the following options:

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice (repeated from Session One)

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngāhua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

Workshop 2: Kei Te Whai Whakaaro/Tinkering with Ideas

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Come prepared to tinker!!!! The morning provides time to tinker with both your hands and your thoughts. As children and teachers tinker with ideas they build their crea+ve muscle and a sense of camaraderie. Learning should not be emotionally flat - what can help us as teachers to make learning come alive? We will look at the ideas from Simon Nicholson’s Theory of Loose Parts, Gever Tulley’s Tinkering School and Guy Claxton’s Building Learning Power to consider how we support children’s holistic learning inside the Te Whāriki framework.

As you tinker you will be challenged to think about the big question of 21st Century learning and what is different from the last 100 years. Neither teaching nor learning should be emotionally flat and when teachers connect with their own passions, sense of wonderment, awe, creativity and strengths, then learning becomes deeply engaging for everyone.

Workshop 3: “In every walk with nature one receives far more than one seeks.”- John Muir, 19 July 1877 (repeated from Session One)

Presented by Michelle Flower

Biophilia is our innate biological connection with nature. It helps explain why roaring fires and lapping waves captivate us; why being in a garden can enhance our creativity; why shadows and heights instill fascination; and why animal companions and strolling through a park have healing effects.

In this workshop we will look at the design considerations that support the relationships between children and nature in early childhood settings. Let’s create spaces that are inspirational, restorative and healthy, as well as functional. Environments that nurture a love of place, where curiosity, courage and wonder thrive.

Workshop 4: Not your standard flower…Let’s be extraordinary(repeated from Session One)

Presented by Lorraine Sands

We know that when children build their ideas about risk and challenge, they start from where they feel comfortable, then stretch the edges of their competence. They practice. It is when they are crew members rather than passengers that children ramp up their capacity for learning; adventurous learning that relies on a growing sense of fair mindedness and on curiosity and determination to stretch learning to the edge and beyond with and alongside their friends. And this is true for teachers too!! When teachers feel empowered to contribute their own passions, energies and spirits to their learning and teaching community and truly feel listened to, they ramp up their contributions. It is when we feel judged that we shrink away from contributing with whole hearted energy!

This was behind our focus and determination to make the professional work we do exciting, meaningful, and practical. Possible, in ways that would see us stretching our learning and teaching, with contextual evidence that acted as the trace of our professional lives. So, what about empowerment for teachers? What about strength based learning for teachers? And what might this look like inside internal evaluation, teacher appraisal and teacher certification?

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW!

 

 

DESIGNING YOUR CURRICULUM

Lynn Rupe and Tania Bullick are coming to the South Island in April 2019!

Workshops will explore ideas around curriculum, assessment, planning, Te Whatu Pōkeka and Te Titiriti-based practice.

Using these practices, we hold the child, their family and whānau firmly at the centre of everything, while honouring their contributions as a basis for the design of a local curriculum for your individual setting.

There will be a choice of two workshops, repeated over two session times so you can attend one or both.


Early-bird Price (for bookings made before 31 January 2019)

$55.00 per workshop

$100.00 for the same person to attend both workshops

Click here to download a flyer for printing

QUEENSTOWN
Monday 1 April
4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

INVERCARGILL
Tuesday 2 April
4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

DUNEDIN
Wednesday 3 April
4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

CHRISTCHURCH
Thursday 4 April
6:00pm-8:00pm only

Venues to be confirmed

                                        

Workshop options:

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngā hua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

 

Workshop 2: Matanga Kairāranga/ Expert Weaver

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Te Whāriki 2017 says, “the expert weaver will examine the foundations for planning and technique. If these are sound, the quality will be seen on the face-up side.” During this workshop we will delve into Te Whāriki 2017 and consider what you would weave into your local curriculum to create an whāriki worthy of an expert weaver. What does Te Whāriki 2017 inspire you to weave?

During the workshop you will have the opportunity to think about your local curriculum and decide was is valuable for children’s learning. Also you will ask yourself the question what makes an expert weaver? At the end of the workshop you will have a woven whāriki representing the foundations of learning for children - foundations that will support children for lifelong learning.

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW!