Workshops 2019

Workshops that encourage, inspire and empower

 

 

 

Unpacking Te Whāriki 2017

An ELP workshop series for 2019

Don Rowlands Events Centre, Mighty River Domain, Lake Karapiro, Cambridge

"Ko te ahurei o te tamaiti arahia o tatou mahi
Let the uniqueness of the child guide our work” 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A FLYER FOR PRINTING AND SHARING WITH YOUR CENTRE

This series of workshops will support teachers to unpack Te Whāriki 2017.  We have broken the series down into mornings where you have the opportunity to attend two workshops on each date.  Over the year we will be covering many of the new ideas within Te Whāriki, one small bite size at a time.  


Two workshops will be repeated over two sessions on the following dates:

SATURDAY 18 MAY
Dispostional learning and working theories

SATURDAY 17 AUGUST
Assessment, planning and evaluation

SATURDAY 2 NOVEMBER
Pathways to school and local curriculum


PROGRAMME:

Session one: 9:00am-10:45am
Break
Session two: 11:15am-1:00pm

Cost: $90.00 per event


Beginning on Saturday 2 February with Tania Bullick and Lynn Rupe:

Workshop One: Being a learner in the 21st Century: A closer look at Building Learning Power and Dispositions
Presented by Wendy Lee

Learning Stories are New Zealand’s unique assessment practice. This idea emerged out of the first research carried out specifically to consider what might assessment look like now we have Te Whāriki. Te Whāriki (2017) states “Narrative forms of assessment, such as Learning Stories, may make use of a formative assessment sequence of noticing, recognising and responding recording and revisiting valued learning”.  Learning dispositions are critical for encouraging valued learning in the 21st century and this view has been strengthened in Te Whāriki (2017). 

In this workshop we will be focusing on how we as kaiako can support children’s view of themselves as confident and capable learners through the documentation of Learning Stories. We will take a closer look at dispositions and consider what learning is going on in children’s learning episodes, with a view to deepening the learning analysis of the Learning Story.  We will also look at what Guy Claxton calls a split screen in relation to analysing our Learning Stories. There will also be opportunities for people to raise questions and discuss issues.

Workshop Two: Children's working theories: Do you let me fly?
Presented by Lorraine Sands

Can my ideas be the focus of my play? Can I choose the time and space for this to happen? Can I be with the people that are important to me?

Children’s learning identities flourish when they can pursue their working theories because Children who are ‘up for challenge’ realise that anything worth doing takes time, effort, patient exploration and a willingness to explore possibilities.

This doesn’t mean that learning happens easily. In the process, children build an understanding of themselves as learners who don’t give up; as learners who like to trial new approaches and as learners who enjoy the stimulation of tricky challenging goals with and alongside their friends. 

Children’s curiosity to explore and understand their world is strengthened when they can do this in a richly resourced environment with teachers who are finely tuned in to their interests, energies and passions.

Click here to book your spots now!


An outline of what will be covered on each date throughout the year:

17 August 2019

We will cover topics that are always of great interest to teachers - assessment, planning and evaluation.  Michelle Flower will talk about assessment & planning and Tania Bullick will discuss evaluation.  We want to ensure that everything we do in ECE is meaningful, so what does it mean to have useful assessment, planning and evaluation?  "Assessment is formative, intended to support curriculum planning and enhance learning.” This inspirational morning will support teachers to understand how to plan and evaluate in ways that are meaningful and support individual children’s learning.

2 November 2019

We will cover Pathways to School and Local Curriculum, both new terms in Te Whāriki 2017.  Carol Marks will unpack the view of Te Whāriki on pathways to school while Lynn Rupe will ask the questions - what does local curriculum mean and what would you weave into your own local curriculum?

Full workshop titles and blurbs will be released soon.

Click here to be directed to our online store to purchase

Early Childhood Professional Learning Workshops

SATURDAY 30 MARCH 2019
9:00am - 12:30pm
Fairley Motor Lodge, cnr Tareha St & Meeanee Quay, Napier

Attendees will have the option of attending one workshop, or save and register for both!

Cost: $45.00pp for one workshop | $85.00pp for both workshops

 

                                                

   To download a flyer for printing and sharing with your team please click here. 


Te Whatu Pōkeka - kaupapa Māori assessment for learning

9:00am - 10:30am

E kore au e ngaro, he kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea.

I will never be lost for I am a seed sown in Rangiātea

Te Whatu Pōkeka provides a wonderful framework for educators to develop their professional bi-cultural practice within an Early childhood setting. It provides a view for educators to learn about relationships, rituals and practices common amongst Māori culture which originates from the story of Te Orokohanga. Te Whatu Pōkeka can be the tool to begin this journey to strengthen bicultural practices within your centre and developing a Māori world view. A time to share thoughts and ideas and assessment using a te ao Māori framework.

Strengthening a bi-cultural curriculum

11:00am - 12:30pm

We are challenged to transform from a mono-cultural programme where some things are added on, to an authentic engagement in real bi-cultural experiences (Ritchie and Rau 2008).

Te Whāriki is built on a foundation of Māori values and belief systems. This workshop will share an insight into some of the practices that support these values and beliefs and can bring richness to all children of any culture.


Brought to you by Carol Marks, Professional Learning Facilitator, Educational Leadership Project

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW!

 

                                        

Venue: Nayland Primary School, 225 Nayland Road, Stoke, Nelson

PROGRAMME:

10:00am: Welcome and Keynote 

10:30-12:30: Workshop Session One

12:30-1:30: Lunch break

1:30-3:30: Workshop Session Two

3:30-3:45: Poroporaki

Click here to download a flyer for printing

Early-Bird Price: $100.00 per teacher

Workshops will explore ideas around curriculum, assessment, planning, Te Whatu Pōkeka and Te Titiriti-based practice. Using these practices, we hold the child, their family and whānau firmly at the centre of everything, while honouring their contributions as a basis for the design of a local curriculum for your individual setting.

Session One – attendees to pick one workshop from the following options:

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngāhua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

Workshop 2: Matanga Kairāranga/ Expert Weaver

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Te Whāriki 2017 says, “the expert weaver will examine the foundations for planning and technique. If these are sound, the quality will be seen on the face-up side.” During this workshop we will delve into Te Whāriki 2017 and consider what you would weave into your local curriculum to create an whāriki worthy of an expert weaver. What does Te Whāriki 2017 inspire you to weave?

During the workshop you will have the opportunity to think about your local curriculum and decide was is valuable for children’s learning. Also you will ask yourself the question what makes an expert weaver? At the end of the workshop you will have a woven whāriki representing the foundations of learning for children - foundations that will support children for lifelong learning.

Workshop 3: “In every walk with nature one receives far more than one seeks.”- John Muir, 19 July 1877

Presented by Michelle Flower

Biophilia is our innate biological connection with nature. It helps explain why roaring fires and lapping waves captivate us; why being in a garden can enhance our creativity; why shadows and heights instil fascination; and why animal companions and strolling through a park have healing effects.

In this workshop we will look at the design considerations that support the relationships between children and nature in early childhood settings. Let’s create spaces that are inspirational, restorative and healthy, as well as functional. Environments that nurture a love of place, where curiosity, courage and wonder thrive.

Workshop 4: Not your standard flower…Let’s be extraordinary!

Presented by Lorraine Sands

We know that when children build their ideas about risk and challenge, they start from where they feel comfortable, then stretch the edges of their competence. They practice. It is when they are crew members rather than passengers that children ramp up their capacity for learning; adventurous learning that relies on a growing sense of fair mindedness and on curiosity and determination to stretch learning to the edge and beyond with and alongside their friends. And this is true for teachers too!! When teachers feel empowered to contribute their own passions, energies and spirits to their learning and teaching community and truly feel listened to, they ramp up their contributions. It is when we feel judged that we shrink away from contributing with whole hearted energy!

This was behind our focus and determination to make the professional work we do exciting, meaningful, and practical. Possible, in ways that would see us stretching our learning and teaching, with contextual evidence that acted as the trace of our professional lives. So, what about empowerment for teachers? What about strength based learning for teachers? And what might this look like inside internal evaluation, teacher appraisal and teacher certification?

Session Two – attendees to pick one workshop from the following options:

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice (repeated from Session One)

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngāhua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

Workshop 2: Kei Te Whai Whakaaro/Tinkering with Ideas

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Come prepared to tinker!!!! The morning provides time to tinker with both your hands and your thoughts. As children and teachers tinker with ideas they build their crea+ve muscle and a sense of camaraderie. Learning should not be emotionally flat - what can help us as teachers to make learning come alive? We will look at the ideas from Simon Nicholson’s Theory of Loose Parts, Gever Tulley’s Tinkering School and Guy Claxton’s Building Learning Power to consider how we support children’s holistic learning inside the Te Whāriki framework.

As you tinker you will be challenged to think about the big question of 21st Century learning and what is different from the last 100 years. Neither teaching nor learning should be emotionally flat and when teachers connect with their own passions, sense of wonderment, awe, creativity and strengths, then learning becomes deeply engaging for everyone.

Workshop 3: “In every walk with nature one receives far more than one seeks.”- John Muir, 19 July 1877 (repeated from Session One)

Presented by Michelle Flower

Biophilia is our innate biological connection with nature. It helps explain why roaring fires and lapping waves captivate us; why being in a garden can enhance our creativity; why shadows and heights instill fascination; and why animal companions and strolling through a park have healing effects.

In this workshop we will look at the design considerations that support the relationships between children and nature in early childhood settings. Let’s create spaces that are inspirational, restorative and healthy, as well as functional. Environments that nurture a love of place, where curiosity, courage and wonder thrive.

Workshop 4: Not your standard flower…Let’s be extraordinary(repeated from Session One)

Presented by Lorraine Sands

We know that when children build their ideas about risk and challenge, they start from where they feel comfortable, then stretch the edges of their competence. They practice. It is when they are crew members rather than passengers that children ramp up their capacity for learning; adventurous learning that relies on a growing sense of fair mindedness and on curiosity and determination to stretch learning to the edge and beyond with and alongside their friends. And this is true for teachers too!! When teachers feel empowered to contribute their own passions, energies and spirits to their learning and teaching community and truly feel listened to, they ramp up their contributions. It is when we feel judged that we shrink away from contributing with whole hearted energy!

This was behind our focus and determination to make the professional work we do exciting, meaningful, and practical. Possible, in ways that would see us stretching our learning and teaching, with contextual evidence that acted as the trace of our professional lives. So, what about empowerment for teachers? What about strength based learning for teachers? And what might this look like inside internal evaluation, teacher appraisal and teacher certification?

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW!

 


Lynn Rupe and Tania Bullick are coming to the South Island in April 2019! Workshops will explore ideas around curriculum, assessment, planning, Te Whatu Pōkeka and Te Titiriti-based practice. Using thes practices, we hold the child, their family and whānua firmly at the centre of everything, whild honouring their contributions as a basis for the design of a local curriculum for your individual setting.

There will be a choice of two workshops, repeated over two session times, so attendees will have the option of attending one workshop or both. Apart from Christchurch, where only one session will be held, so attendees will need to choose one workshop only.

Early-bird Price

$55.00 per workshop

$100.00 for the same person to attend both workshops (for all locations except Christchurch)

Click here to download a flyer for printing and sharing with your team

For those attending both workshops please bring along a drink and snack for the break times

QUEENSTOWN
Monday 1 April

Remarkables Primary School, 49 Lake Avenue, Frankton
4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

DUNEDIN
Wednesday 3 April

University of Otago, Castle Building (Central Campus)
Workshop One to be held in Castle D
(Castle Room D is located on the ground floor on the eastern side of the
Castle Theatre Complex, adjacent to the River Leith
).
Workshop Two to be held in Castle A
(Castle A is located on the lower ground floor on the northern side of the
Castle Theatre Complex)

4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

INVERCARGILL
Tuesday 2 April

Elmwood Gardens, 309 Dee Street
4:00pm-6:00pm and again from 6:30pm-8:30pm

CHRISTCHURCH (only one session will be
held so attendees will need to pick one
workshop)

Thursday 4 April

Haeata Community Campus, 240 Breezes Road
6:00pm-8:00pm only

(For the Inspiration Morning for Leaders in
Christchurch, please scroll down to the bottom
of the page)

Workshop options - attendees can pick one or attend both in all locations except Christchurch where attendees will need to pick one workshop only

Workshop 1: Learning Stories as a Reflective Lens for Te Tiriti-based Practice

Kotahi te Kākano, he nui ngā hua o te rākau

A Tree comes from one seed but bears many fruit

Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will explore the ways that individual and teams of teachers can broaden their understanding of Te Tiriti based Practices and bicultural development using Learning Stories as a vehicle for reflection and growth.  Drawing on the Learning Story and Te Whatu Pōkeka frameworks, and drawing on the assumption that children’s contributions grow a unique local curriculum, participants will reflect on their connections with and knowledge of the children, families and whānau within their setting as a foundation for further developing Te Tiriti-based practice within their curriculum design and planning. 

 

Workshop 2: Matanga Kairāranga/ Expert Weaver

Presented by Lynn Rupe

Te Whāriki 2017 says, “the expert weaver will examine the foundations for planning and technique. If these are sound, the quality will be seen on the face-up side.” During this workshop we will delve into Te Whāriki 2017 and consider what you would weave into your local curriculum to create an whāriki worthy of an expert weaver. What does Te Whāriki 2017 inspire you to weave?

During the workshop you will have the opportunity to think about your local curriculum and decide was is valuable for children’s learning. Also you will ask yourself the question what makes an expert weaver? At the end of the workshop you will have a woven whāriki representing the foundations of learning for children - foundations that will support children for lifelong learning.

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW!


 

                                  

Session One: 9:00am-10:30am

Session Two: 11:00am-12:30pm

Cost: $85.00 per teacher

Location: The Garden Hotel, 110 Marshland Road, Shirley, Christchurch

Click here to download a flyer for printing and sharing with your team


Workshops

I'm ok, you're ok / Kei te pai ahau, kei te pai koe
Presented by Lynn Rupe

Te Whāriki (2017, pg. 20) reminds us that, “the wellbeing of each child is interdependent with the wellbeing of their kaiako, parents and whānau.” Bronfenbrenner believed that the quality of the interactions with children is very much  reliant on the caregiver receiving support and recognition.

I’m ok, you’re ok is an opportunity to think about teachers’ wellbeing!  How do we ensure that the teacher (caregiver) receives support and recognition in order for wonderful teaching practice to flourish?  What does teacher wellbeing have to do with children’s wellbeing?  And how can we ensure teachers are OK?  Aroha mai, aroha atu.

Meaningfull, Motivating and Measurable
Presented by Tania Bullick

This workshop will give you the opportunity to think about strategic planning, annual planning and ways of working that align many of the governance requirements within early childhood centres. We will discuss ways of being that tick all the boxes for staff appraisal, teacher registration, internal evaluation, assessment, planning and strategic and annual plans. ERO want to see more alignment in all these areas and we will discuss aligning each of these tasks through meaningful, measurable and motivating ways of working as a team. “Intrinsically meaningful experiences equals ownership”. Fullan (p. 82).

Click HERE to book your spot now!